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Posts Tagged ‘Time Magazine’

Four days before Trump’s isolationist Inaugural Address, Xi made his first trip to the gathering of the globalist elite at Davos.  “We should commit ourselves to growing an open global economy,” he said.  “Pursuing protectionism is like locking oneself in a dark room.  While wind and rain may be kept outside, that dark room will also block light and air.”
   —  Xi Jinping
China’s Chairman of the Communist Party
Quoted by: Karl Vick and Charlie Campbell
In their article: “China’s Leader Vies For Global Dominance
Time Magazine, dtd: 17 December 2017
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On This Day In:
2017 It’s Even Dimmer When You Don’t Have It
2016 Inconvenienced By Degree
2015 Sincerity
2014 Prayers For Junior
Senseless
2013 Interesting Drink
Super Bowl XLVII Declared A No Bird Zone
2012 Smile
2011 Come Forward
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The divisions are now as physical as they are emotional and intellectual: in the 2016 election, of America’s 3,113 counties, just 303 went to either candidate by 10 points or fewer; 1,196 saw landslides of 50 points or more.  We have self-sorted into private pockets of affirmation, and where we live shapes what we believe.  “These days, Democrats and Republicans no longer stop at disagreeing with each other’s ideas,” argues Paul Taylor of the Pew Research Center.  “Many in each party now deny the other’s facts, disapprove of each other’s lifestyles, avoid each other’s neighborhoods, impugn each other’s motives, doubt each other’s patriotism, can’t stomach each other’s news sources and bring different value systems to such core social institutions as religion, marriage and parenthood.  It’s as if they belong not to rival parties but alien tribes.”
During his campaign, Trump engaged and inspired millions of voters who had given up on government and were desperate for a new vision, a new voice.  Their needs are real and urgent, and have been largely ignored as the President reduced the office to a vanity plate.  He has shown how little loyalty he feels to friends and allies who honor some principle higher than his self-interest.  In the aftermath of Charlottesville, we saw the reverse: we saw his reluctance to turn away from people who admire him, claim him, even if they do so in the name of beliefs that Americans have died fighting to defeat.  There will be more marches, more clashes and, if the white supremacist leaders are right, more lives lost before this latest battle for the nation’s soul resolves.  But it is a historic shame and sorrow that so few Americans can come to that struggle with the faith that their President is on their side.
   –  Nancy Gibbs
From her editorial: “Will the Nation Succeed After Charlottesville Where Donald Trump Failed?
Time Magazine, dtd: Aug. 17, 2017
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On This Day In:
2017 Right
2016 At Least One Step
2015 Month To Month Rental
2014 Professional Beliefs
2013 Books Are…
2012 True Distinguishing Marks
2010 Sub-300

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In the Middle East, and in isolated pockets of Western Europe, we see people, especially young men, who love the idea of an absolute answer to everything.  That cast of mind has not very often acquired political power, but when it does it’s absolutely murderous.
     —  Philip Pullman
From the interview / article: “Philip Pullman isn’t done building new worlds
Written by Dan Stewart
Appearing in Time Magazine, dtd: 30 October 2017
Online at:  http://time.com/4988596/philip-pullman-la-belle-sauvage/
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On This Day In:
2016 Proceeding Still
2015 Seeing Rainbows
I Am A Runner
2014 The Law Of The Perversity Of Nature
2013 One Standard Deviation
2012 High Anxiety
2011 And I’m Taking Me There
2010 1,000

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The existing safety net for older Americans – a mixture of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid – was built for a society that no longer exists.  When Congress created Social Security in 1935, the average life expectancy in the U.S. was 61; now it is nearly 80.  When Congress created Medicare and Medicaid in 1965, it was still common for people to die of acute medical issues, like heart attacks; now many survive those traumas and go on to live, with some assistance, for decades longer.  In 1960, the U.S. was overwhelmingly young: just 10% of the population was over 65.  By 2040, 1 in 5 of us will be eligible for that senior ticket at the theater.
As more people live longer, the social and economic systems designed to care for them are changing.  In midcentury America, women had yet to join the traditional workforce en masse and so were widely expected to keep doing what they’d always done: provide unpaid care to children and ailing relatives at home.  Moreover, in the 1960s, a large portion of families had access to stable, fixed pensions in retirement, and about a quarter of all workers were covered by generous, union-negotiated contracts.  Staying in the same job for decades was common.
None of that is true anymore.  Some 40% of households with children under 18 are now headed by women who are the primary breadwinner.  Those women can no longer stay home to care for children or ailing relatives without risking their family’s financial stability.  Meanwhile, fixed pensions have all but disappeared, and union membership has fallen by more than half.  Nearly 1 in 3 nonretired Americans has no retirement savings at all.  “Our current system doesn’t reflect how we’ve changed as a society,” explains Dr. Bruce Chernof, president and CEO of the SCAN Foundation, which advocates for older adults.  “So it’s being asked to do all kinds of things it wasn’t designed to do.”
Much of the U.S. economy rides on how this crisis plays out.  Spending on long-term care is expected to more than double from 1.3% of GDP to 3% by 2050 as demand increases alongside an aging populace.  America’s entrepreneurial system is coming up with myriad new ways to serve this growing demographic of gray-hairs.  But in an era of deregulation, companies that profit from the natural, but often unsettling, process of aging and dying aren’t always scrupulous.  The result is a social tension: As health care companies seek to reap not only efficiencies but also profits from a jury-rigged, outdated and overburdened system of elder care, how do we protect those who are often most vulnerable to exploitation?
When things don’t work, the results are ugly.  In nursing homes and assisted-living centers, ever more ubiquitous arbitration agreements leave the elderly without access to a basic civil trial.  Hospice care, beloved by many, is seen as a potential profit center by companies seeking government contracts while providing diminished service to those at the end of their lives.  And Medicaid, once intended to be a last-ditch safeguard for the poorest of the poor, is creaking under the weight of new obligations.  Medicaid is now the default payer for 61% of all nursing-home residents in the U.S., according to a June 2017 Kaiser Family Foundation report – a demand that’s likely to continue to increase.  Meanwhile, adult children already contribute $7,000 to $14,000 a year to caring for an aging parent, according to a 2016 AARP report; that number will likely see an uptick too.
  —  Haley Sweetland Edwards
From the “Special Report”: “Dignity, death and America’s crisis in elder care
Time Magazine, 27 November 2017 issue
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On This Day In:
2016 And A Fellow Who Insists On Telling Us He’s Smart?
2015 Curves Ahead
2014 Sitting?
2013 Misperceptions
2012 Essential Experience
2011 Lest We Forget Those Still In Harm’s Way
Sound Familiar?

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You’ve said that maturity is “a matter of progressing ever closer to your ideal self.”  What is your ideal self?
To travel this world without being tied to others.  Not in the sense of crossing the sky like a bird.  My meaning stems from the fact that people constantly compare themselves to others.  They find it difficult to decide the best way to live, I guess, and comparisons help them evaluate their own situation.  A person can attain pure freedom only by being set free from being a person.
What would you tell parents who are sad that their child has been diagnosed with autism?
I don’t think of my autism as a misfortune.  You may be stuck, your suffering may be ongoing, but time flows on.  What your child needs right now is to see your smile.  Create lots of happy memories together.  When we know we are loved, the courage we need to resist depression and sadness wells up from inside us.
     —  Naoki Higashida
From an interview appearing in Time Magazine 7 August 2017
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On This Day In:
2016 Good Acts
2015 Will You Be Leaving Soon?
2014 Just Long Enough
2013 R.I.P. – Tom Laughlin
Seeking Success?
2012 All Aboard
2011 Sail On, Sailor

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Our culture likes its heroes undaunted, especially in the stories we tell.  When I did end up writing the scary-robot show, I found myself clashing with executives.  I argued that bravery in the face of death shouldn’t be the protagonists’ default setting.  Because when we glorify strength without showing empathy for weakness, we end up with a toxic version of heroism, one that links bravery to goodness and cowardice to getting what you deserve.
And when we do that, we can no longer tell stories of grace, or forgiveness, or connectedness.  We can no longer tell stories about real people — the ones who fail, the ones who are afraid and the ones who let themselves and others down.  These are the stories we need more than ever, especially those of us walking on life’s edge.
   —  Josh Friedman
From his opinion editorial: “It’s O.K. to be a coward about cancer
Time Magazine, 7 August 2017
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On This Day In:
2016 Heart Trouble
2015 From The Inside Out
2014 Alone And Free
2013 Superstition Is Your Way
2012 Escape Hatches
2011 Sing Like No One Is Listening

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Dear President Trump,
Representing the United States in the Olympic Games was the greatest honor of my life.  I will never forget walking into Opening Ceremonies behind our American flag that I revere surrounded by my teammates.  Each drawn from different sports, many of different faiths and various ethnicities.  Yet, in that diversity was America itself: united by love for our country.
My story is a quintessential small-town-America story.  In my hometown, Maplewood, New Jersey, the question was always which sport I would play, not whether I would play one.   My point isn’t really about sport, it’s about opportunity — the opportunity to strive for and believe in one’s own destiny.  That is what made America’s story so unique from any that preceded it, and mine and every other American’s as well.
I love America because of the simultaneous idea that we are both exceptional and flawed — as individuals and a nation — and, that it is our collective responsibility as a people to honor each other’s potential.
That is why I am writing you this letter.
I am the picture of the American Dream — a public school kid, with loving parents who told me that with hard work and perseverance, I could be whatever I wanted to be.  By believing in myself and refusing to take no for an answer, I have broken barriers and shattered stereotypes.  I was the first Muslim woman to represent the United States in the Olympic Games wearing hijab.  I was blessed to win an Olympic medal alongside my team at the Rio Games.  I was a black Muslim woman in a little known sport.  And on the world’s biggest stage, I defied labels and showed the world that being Muslim was also being American.
And yet, when I listen to you, I feel that the story you tell paints another picture entirely.  You seem to see refugees fleeing terror as terror’s root, rather than refugees as terror’s victims.  You seem to see our nation’s contributions to refugee resettlement as “bad deals,” rather than as shining examples of what America has always stood for.  You seem to see the hijab I wear as a signal of threat and cause for fear.  You’ve said, “I think Islam hates us.”  That is not only wrong, it provokes fear and hatred, and as we have seen it also provokes violence against Muslims and our places of worship.  Surely that was not your intention — I do not want to believe that.  Yet I feel that you and your administration see me and people like me not as fellow Americans, but as “others.”  Your ban on travelers from Muslim-majority countries and Syrian refugees has implications that are felt far beyond the countries listed.  I am referring to implications not only in the courthouse, but in line at Starbucks.  Not on the nightly news but in the night terrors of children who wonder if their home and parents, are safe.  Is this what you intended when you took your oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States?
The climate of fear and hatred fueled and perpetuated by your campaign is gaining momentum through your actions in office.  Since your election, I have been “profiled” at the airport, accused of looking “suspicious” and, on the streets of New York, I have been told to “go back to my country.”  This isn’t the America that I know and it isn’t the America that the world looks to for inspiration and leadership.
There are 3 million American Muslims.  They teach our children, treat our sick, fight our wars, and despite your attacks, continue to stand proudly on the front lines of keeping all Americans safe.  My faith calls on me to help the less fortunate and speak out against injustice.  President Trump, look at the math: we do not have a refugee terrorist problem.  It simply doesn’t exist.  But, I do fear a not-so-subtle campaign of terror now being waged on our American ideals of justice and equality.
The Olympic Movement chose its symbol of interlocking rings of many different colors to demonstrate humanity’s unity.  Sport has always been an equalizer and a symbol of peace, even in the ancient Games when wars would cease for the competitions.  Indeed, as much pride as I take in being one of America’s firsts, what I most love about my Olympic experience is that my success was born out of my opportunity, freedom and liberty as an American.
Overcoming obstacles was my challenge as an athlete.  It is now my challenge as a citizen.  I once represented you.  Now you represent me.  I urge you to do so with the humility, thoughtfulness and kindness befitting your sacred office.  As an African-American Muslim Woman patriot, my religion commands me to remain hopeful, to believe in our ability to fight bigotry with love and draw our strength from diversity.  That is what makes America great.  Time and again.
Sincerely,
Ibtihaj Muhammad
From her editorial: “I Fear President Trump’s ‘Campaign of Terror’ Against American Ideals
Under: “The View: A Letter to the President
Time Magazine, April 3, 2017
The specific link: http://time.com/4706627/olympic-fencer-ibtihaj-muhammad-donald-trump/
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On This Day In:
2016 As Far From
2015 Rocky 7
Just Like Politics
2014 Game And Legend
“Scientific” Pride In Humanity
2013 Real Honor
Catching Up
2012 Thoughts And Communications
2011 But How Does Peter Feel?
2010 Name That Regret

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