Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Time Magazine’

And yet, it’s a happier fact of human behavior that all tribes are separated less by walls than by membranes, and those membranes can break and the tribes combine as easily as two raindrops running down a windshield that need merely touch to merge.  But something must make the touching happen — and not many things can.
And if it made us small?  If it made us feel that we are of less consequence, less magnitude, than we usually think we are?  Well, good.  Humility was part of the veil of peace that was drawn over the country on Aug. 21.  So was community.  And so, it would be nice to think, was gratitude.
   —  Jeffrey Kluger
From his article: “Mother Nature, the uniter, briefly eclipses the nation’s divisions
Describing the 21 August 2017, totality eclipse for Time Magazine dtd: 4 September 2017
.
On This Day In:
2016 Obstacles
Election + 2 Weeks
2015 Done What You Could
2014 Impossible To Other Men
2013 Just In Case
2012 Isn’t This Just Pleasant?
2011 No Void In Sight
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Conservatism is measured and reliable.  Conservative foreign policy is where you embrace your allies and recognize your enemies.  That’s a long way from where we are today.  We’ve adopted a populist attitude that is a sugar high.
  —  Senator Jeff Flake
U.S. Senator (R) from Arizona
Quoted in the article “8 Questions
In Time Magazine dtd: 21 August 2017
Written by: Jack Brewster
.
On This Day In:
2016 The Business Of Life
2015 Alone Again, Naturally
2014 Agreed
2013 Smile From Your Heart!
2012 Like You
2011 Got Days?
2010 K9 Humor – Has Anyone Seen My Setter? (Must read!!)
A Longer Blog Than You Want To Read (Probably)
2009 Back and Forth and Round Again…

Read Full Post »

But if a civilized society is going to include death as a punishment and yet remain civilized, the process must be made rigorous and the decisions difficult.
   —  David Von Drehle
From his obituary for Scarlette Holdman: “The lasting legacy of a life devoted to loving the sinner
Appearing in the 31 July 2017 issue of Time Magazine
.
On This Day In:
2016 Where And Why
2015 The Beauty Of Thy Voice
2014 Faith In Men
2013 An Average Verge
2012 Dew Drop Secrets
2011 Champion Freedom

Read Full Post »

Art derives its power not by being timely but by being timeless, for timelessness outlasts division.
   —  David Von Drehle
From his article / opinion piece: “Movie Stars and the Perils of the Podium
In:  Time Magazine
23 January 2017
.
On This Day In:
2016 Said The Man Who Trained To Fight For A Living
2015 Tripping On Treasure
2014 The Flower Of Light
2013 Eye Catching
2012 The Holstee Manifesto
2011 Three Crooners For The Shower
The Soldier’s Faith
Vacation, Books And Lots Of Movies

Read Full Post »

From my own research with exceptional cancer survivors, I know that profound psychological change is possible, especially when the patient is confronted with a life-threatening illness.  As one survivor in my sample said, “It was either change or die.  I learn quickly with that kind of stimuli.
   —  Paul C. Roud, Ed. D
University of Massachusetts – Amherst
From a letter to Time Magazine responding to an article about the effect of attitude on surviving illnesses.
[The article was publish in the mid-1980’s.  Unfortunately, I didn’t record specific attribution data in my journal back then.  —  KMAB]
.
On This Day In:
2016 Dave’s Not Here, Man
2015 Blink
2014 The Struggle To Educate America Continues…
2013 On Elections
2012 Warm Smiles
Pick Your Poison
2011 Straight Shooters

Read Full Post »

It says something both odd and exceptional about our species that while we could rightly be preoccupied with the simple business of surviving on the one world we’ve got — keeping the people in our own small tribe fed and healthy and safe from the perceived menace of the tribes across the valley — we always have one eye trained outward.  We can’t say exactly what we’re looking for — deliverance, company, answers to eternal questions — but we look out all the same.
Building the instruments that make that wondering gaze possible isn’t easy or cheap, and none of it pays the kinds of earthly dividends that pick-and-shovel programs like fixing roads or building airports do.  But there are other kinds of dividends as well, and if uncovering the universe’s most ancient secrets doesn’t qualify, what would?  Washington could certainly spend its money more frugally, but it’s hard to see how it could spend it more imaginatively.
   —  Jeffrey Kluger
From his article: “Eyes In the Sky
Appearing in: Time Magazine, dtd: July 3, 2017
The link to the article is: http://time.com/4828091/eyes-in-the-sky/
.
On This Day In:
2016 Private Entrance
Camping Out In Camden
2015 Quality Government
A Handful Of Flics
2014 Just Another Brick From The Wall
2013 Artistic Demands
2012 Foundations
2011 Are We Devouring Yet?

Read Full Post »

It wouldn’t be healthy, or efficient, to remember every event or experience in its full factual and emotional context.  But separating the emotional aspects of a memory — the anger over an argument with your spouse, the frustration at the guy who cut you off in traffic, the dejection you felt after getting a curt email reply from your boss — from its objective parts allows you to recall the experience without reliving it.  “We sleep to remember and we sleep to forget,” says Walker, the UC Berkeley sleep scientist, of this coping mechanism.  “I call it overnight therapy.”
This type of processing takes time.  It likely happens only during deep, quality sleep, and only over consistent nights of such sleep.  That may explain why people who cut their sleep short or experience interrupted sleep may not fully disentangle the emotional baggage from their memories.
In those cases the memory, in its emotionally taxing entirety, continues to resurface every time the brain tries to sleep, in a vain effort to be properly processed.  The brain tries to store the memory in a neutral way, but without deep sleep, there just isn’t enough time for that triage.
Walker believes these aborted efforts may drive conditions like PTSD, which is well understood to be common among combat veterans but which may be more common among the general population than therapists and researchers previously thought.
“The more nights you sleep, the more soothing the influence of sleep on that memory,” he says.  “Sleep continues to work on those emotional memories and flatten them out after about a week.  Now there’s great evidence that PTSD is a disorder in which that process fails.”
There’s also strong support for the idea that insufficient sleep may be a trigger for, and not just a symptom of, a number of mental illnesses, including depression, bipolar disorder and even schizophrenia.  Depriving people with bipolar disorder of sleep, for example, can launch a manic episode, while some people with depression report worsening symptoms when they aren’t sleeping well.
Fully understanding the role sleep plays in mental illness is a rich area of future research.  Already many doctors think consistent, high-quality sleep can have a direct bearing on the health of those with mental illness.  “Anyone who suffers from moderate or significant mental-health concerns needs to be aware that sleep may be one of the most important things they can do,” says Walker.
Stress, scientists also know, is one of the more potent accelerators of aging, and a body that’s not sleeping enough looks similar to one that’s stressed out — it’s highly reactive to perceived threats, even when those threats don’t pose any real risk.  Biologically speaking, there’s virtually no difference in the way a body reacts to a startling noise in the middle of the night, a rabid raccoon or a stressful work deadline: in all cases, fight-or-flight mode is triggered, blood pressure spikes, breathing gets shallow, and the heart starts to race.  That’s what happens to a body on no sleep too.
Those stress reactions can be useful, of course: they help you respond more readily to an actual physical threat.  But that’s not usually what’s going on.  And staying in an alert mode can trigger a number of unhealthy conditions, the most damaging of which is inflammation.
Inflammation is the body’s natural defense system against injury or invading microbes like bacteria and viruses.  It’s why your toe turns red and throbs when you stub it or when it’s infected: white blood cells rush to the area in order to protect it for the short time it’s needed to help you get better.  But inflammation can also become chronic, and that’s when the real trouble starts.
Chronic inflammation, doctors now know, is a leading driver of many diseases, including some cancers, cognitive decline, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes—even chronic pain.  And one of the main drivers of chronic inflammation is, of course, not sleeping enough.
Quoted by: Alice Park
In her article: “The Sleep Cure
Time Magazine
Dtd: Feb 27 – Mar 9, 2017
.
On This Day In:
2016 Useful Gift
2015 Who’s The Boss?
2014 What Counts In The Future
2013 Improper Sequence?
2012 Two Gems
2011 A True Test

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: