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Posts Tagged ‘Wired Magazine’

As powerful as advanced AI might be someday, we need to understand it first and think carefully about how it should be applied.  The best thing we can do is make sure we have the best minds working on AI and support research that helps us develop it faster.  Again, it’s just math.  Not magic.
At a very basic level, I think AI is good and not something we should be afraid of.  We’re already seeing examples of how AI can unlock value and improve the world.  If we can choose hope over fear — and if we advance the fundamental science behind AI — then this is only the beginning.
    —  Mark Zuckerberg
Quoted by: Jason Tanz
In his article: “A To-Do List For The Tech Industry
Appearing in: Wired Magazine, dtd: November 2016
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On This Day In:
2016 Today’s Rule
2015 Remembering Oklahoma City
2014 Who Was That Masked Man?
2013 Enemy Mine
2012 Strengthen Me
2011 Service, Please
2010 The Church In Crisis…

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This is a more fruitful approach than trying to erase dialog from the Internet altogether.  We can all agree that material that incites violence doesn’t belong online.  But when ISIS raises questions about the world, you can’t just wipe that from the Internet.  Ideas need to be raised and confronted and disputed.  Right now, it can feel dangerous to challenge extremism online. ­ People get shouted down, harassed, or worse.  That gives power to the bad guys, because it shuts reasonable people out of the conversation, leaving just the violent voices.
We haven’t seen a terrorist organization as digitally savvy as ISIS before, but when you think about it, much of what it’s doing isn’t all that different from what any teenager can do; you wouldn’t be surprised if your 14-year-old daughter made a video and put it online.  It’s only surprising because we have this idea of terrorists as old, bearded men hiding out in the mountains.  Terrorist groups are evolving like the rest of us.  We need to continue experimenting with solutions that meet these groups where they connect with the rest of the world.
—  Yasmin Green
Quoted by: Jason Tanz
In his article: “A To-Do List For The Tech Industry
Appearing in: Wired Magazine, dtd: November 2016
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On This Day In:
2016 Consistently
2015 We Must Dissent
2014 Now What?
2013 Judgement
2012 Stuck In My Mind
Life’s Hope
2011 Just Getting Up
Directions Please

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This all may sound obvious, but far too little of the tech industry operates this way today.  We’ve gotten to a point where companies aren’t even trying to build a business that will produce profits; they are just trying to stay funded long enough for another company to acquire them.  They are actively chasing the waste instead of the win.  That misplaced focus isn’t just annoying, it contributes to global inequality, because it emphasizes capturing value instead of creating it.  It reminds me of Wall Street in 2007.
And it echoes the story of the economy writ large.  Over the past 30 years, wages have largely flatlined as corporate profits have surged, which means that companies in other sectors too are capturing more wealth than they are creating. This is a recipe for economic stagnation.  Consumer demand is 70 percent of GDP.  So when companies treat people solely as an expense to be automated away, or as mere supply of wealth to be extracted, they are slowly cutting their own throats.
  —  Tim O’Reilly
Quoted by: Jason Tanz
In his article: “A To-Do List For The Tech Industry
Appearing in: Wired Magazine, dtd: November 2016
On This Day In:
2016 Man’s Advantage Over God
2015 Deeply
2014 Hi-Yo Silver, Away!
2013 Warning:
2012 Thinking About Beauty
2011 A Founding Father’s Argument Against Public Funding Of Religious Education
Weekend Update
So Far, So Good

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Clapper says he has never doubted the morality of his profession.  The job of the intelligence community is, in his view, honorably straightforward: to provide policy­makers with objective analysis derived from intelligence gathered through legally authorized methods.
Unpredictable instability has been a constant for this administration and will be, he says, for the next one too.
After a pause, Clapper answered unapologetically: “We can do our job with a clear conscience, but we have to be careful.  The history of the intelligence community is replete with violations of the trust of the American people.”  That doesn’t mean that the job is immoral — it just means the job has to be done correctly.  “I have always accepted intelligence was an honorable profession.  We are all mindful of the need to comply with our moral values and the law.”
  —  James Clapper
From the article: “Watching The Watcher
Article written by: Garrett M. Graff
Article appearing in: Wired Magazine, dtd: December 2016
Link to article:  http://www.wired.com/2016/11/james-clapper-us-intelligence/
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On This Day In:
2016 He Doesn’t Remind Me Of Me
The First Rule
2015 Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow
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2014 I Blame Robocop
2013 Future Trustees
2012 Praise Not The Day…
2011 Educated Living

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Sometimes the stupid gene expresses itself, Tommy.  Genes are always testing themselves to see if they bring reproductive value.
   —  Jerry Hayes
Quoted by Hannah Nordhaus
From her article: “The Honey Trap
Appearing in Wired Magazine, dtd: August 2016
Link to the article:  http://www.wired.com/2016/08/jerry-hayes-how-to-save-the-bees-monsanto/
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On This Day In:
2016 For Me It’s Been Faith
2015 Where Many Paths And Errands Meet
2014 Rimmed Out
2013 Likeness
2012 Sums It Up Quite Well, Actually
2011 Momentary Abandonment

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[Tom] Sachs made one too.  His was plywood and screws and resin.  He left the edges rough.  You can see the color of the wood bleeding through the white paint.  It is, unquestionably, a Tom Sachs artwork.  We both made two, and gave each other one.
Sachs says mine is art too.  I tell him I’m not sure I agree.
“Your Blade Runner gun is totally a piece of art,” he says.
“But I couldn’t sell it at a gallery,” I say.  “I guess I could make another one, but it would kill me to let this one go.”
“It feels like that every single time,” Sachs says.  “That’s when you know it’s good.”  If you cobble together found materials into a bricolage of a prosaic object, but it hurts to let it go, you’re making art.
  —  Adam Savage
From his article: “Ground Control To Major Tom
Appearing in: Wired Magazine, dtd: September 2016
Link to the article:  http://www.wired.com/2016/09/adam-savage-tom-sachs-movie-props/
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On This Day In:
2016 Just A Shame
2015 Treasures Of The Mind
2014 Not Quite Exceeded Reach
2013 Who’s Side?
2012 Why I Joined The Army And Not The Navy…
2011 Is It Your Turn Yet?
Just Trippin’

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…Cooking, as a physical activity, doesn’t come naturally to me.  It never has.  To compensate for my lack of dexterity, speed, and technique, I think about food constantly.  In fact, I’m much stronger at thinking about food than I am at cooking it.  And recently I started seeing patterns in our most successful dishes that suggested our hits weren’t entirely random; there’s a set of underlying laws that links them together.  I’ve struggled to put this into words, and I haven’t talked to my fellow chefs about it, because I worry they’ll think I’m crazy.  But I think there’s something to it, and so I’m sharing it now for the first time.  I call it the Unified Theory of Deliciousness.
This probably sounds absolutely ridiculous, but the theory is rooted in a class I took in college called Advanced Logic.  A philosopher named Howard DeLong taught it; he wrote one of the books that directly inspired Douglas Hofstadter to write “Gödel, Escher, Bach“.  The first day, he said, “This class will change your life,” and I was like, “What kind of asshole is this?”  But he was right.  I would never pretend to be an expert in logic, and I never made it all the way through Gödel, Escher, Bach.  But the ideas and concepts I took away from that class have haunted me ever since.
DeLong and Hofstadter both found great beauty in what the latter called strange loops — occasions when mathematical systems or works of art or pieces of music fold back upon themselves.  M. C. Escher’s drawings are a great, overt example of this.  Take his famous picture of two hands drawing each other; it’s impossible to say where it starts or ends.  When you hit a strange loop like this, it shifts your point of view: Suddenly you aren’t just thinking about what’s happening inside the picture; you’re thinking about the system it represents and your response to it.
 …
Hofstadter (yes, him again) had a different word for what I call base patterns.  He called them isomorphisms, concepts that can be expressed in different ways while retaining their core form.  He used the example of a record player.  The groove in the record, the vibrations in your loudspeaker, the sound waves in the air: These are all different media, but they expresses the same underlying pattern.
That’s how I feel about food.  Different cultures may use different media to express those base patterns — with different ingredients, for instance, depending on what’s available.  But they are, at heart, doing the exact same thing.  They are fundamentally playing the same music.  And if you can recognize that music, you’ll blow people’s minds with a paradox they can taste: the new and the familiar woven together in a strange loop.
   —  David Chang
From the article: “David Chang’s Unified Theory of Deliciousness
In Wired Magazine, dtd:  August 2016
Link to the article: https://www.wired.com/2016/07/chef-david-chang-on-deliciousness/
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On This Day In:
2016 Survival Instinct
2015 Tears
2014 Bourne Again (4)
2013 God’s Protection
2012 Happy Easter!!
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The Value Of Bureaucracies
2011 Logic Cuts

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