Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘What Do You Care What Other People Think?’

Although my mother didn’t know anything about science, she had a great influence on me as well.  In particular, she had a wonderful sense of humor, and I learned from her that the highest forms of understanding we can achieve are laughter and human compassion.
  —  Richard P. Feynman
From his book: “What Do You Care What Other People Think?
.

Read Full Post »

I’ve been caught, so to speak — like someone who was given something wonderful when he was a child, and he’s always looking for it again.  I’m always looking, like a child, for the wonders I know I’m going to find — maybe not every time, but every once in a while.
   —    Richard P. Feynman
From his book: “What Do You Care What Other People Think?
.

Read Full Post »

Everything he read to me he would translate as best he could into some reality.
…I learned from my father to translate: everything I read I try to figure out what it really means, what it’s really saying.
  —  Richard P. Feynman
From his book: “What Do You Care What Other People Think?
.

Read Full Post »

I’ve always been very one-sided about science, and when I was younger I concentrated almost all my effort on it.  In those days, I didn’t have time, and I didn’t have much patience, to learn what’s called the humanities.  Even though there were humanities courses in the university that you had to take in order to graduate, I tried my best to avoid them.  It’s only afterwards, when I’ve gotten older and more relaxed, that I’ve spread out a little bit.  I’ve learned to draw and I read a little bit, but I’m really still a very one-sided person and I don’t know a great deal.  I have a limited intelligence and I use it in a particular direction.
   —    Richard P. Feynman
From his book: “What Do You Care What Other People Think??
.

Read Full Post »

It is our responsibility as scientists, knowing the great progress which comes from a satisfactory philosophy of ignorance, the great progress which is the fruit of freedom of thought, to proclaim the value of this freedom; to teach how doubt is not to be feared but welcomed and discussed; and to demand this freedom as our duty to all coming generations.
   —    Richard P. Feynman
From his book:  “What Do You Care What Other People Think
.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: