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Posts Tagged ‘Sports Illustrated’

“Look,” he says, “I am always different from other peoples.  Absolute.  I am always working and moving and running.  I never stop.  I never want to miss the animals, the show, the life.  Peoples come to see me.  I want to give 100%.  Absolute.  I think I already make some history in circus.  But I must keep going.  More animals to do, more tricks, more fun.”
Peggy Williams remembers a scene last winter when GG-W [Gunther Gebel-Williams] brought his family to a circus ski party in the hills of North Carolina.  It was a rare appearance for him, sharing an off-day with the rest of the denizens of the big top, and Gebel-Williams made the most of it.  He helped the younger ones with their equipment.  He swooped past everybody on the slopes, laughing as he went.
“None of us knew he could ski,” Williams recalls.  “Later I asked him, ‘Goob, you can handle this, too?’  He got this faraway look in his eye that I had never seen.  He sat in the snow and stared.  Then he said, ‘Yeah, yeah.  Skiing is fun.  I ski way back.  I ski before I was a kid.’ “
Right then Peggy Williams knew she had discovered the essence of Gunther Gebel Goober Giblet Williams.  It was so easy.  Most kids dream they run away to join the circus.  This man, Goob, joined the circus to become a kid.  And he never stopped being one.  Absolute.
   —    Gurry Kirkpatrick
From the Sports Illustrated article: “The Greatest Showman on Earth
Dtd: 26 September 1977
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On This Day In:
2015 Still The Best Teacher
2014 Inside The Soul
2013 A Toe In The River
2012 Believe It Or Not
2011 The Road To Recovery (And More Myths)

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Retaining youthful enthusiasm is an art.  If you can be like a child in some ways, staying open and curious, you will never stop learning.  You will never stop improving.
     —    Laird Hamilton
Quoted in the article: “The Maestro“, written by Lee Jenkins
In Sports Illustrated, 21 April 2014
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On This Day In:
2014 Caution
2013 Treat Her Like A Lady
2012 Build New Worlds
2011 I Grok Elegance
Standing Relish

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When you win, you don’t examine it very much, except to congratulate yourself.  You easily, and wrongly, assume it has something to do with your rare qualities as a person.  Losing, on the other hand, really does say something about who your are.  …  If you’re willing to examine failure, and to look not just at your outward physical performance, but your internal workings, too, losing can be valuable.
    —    Lance Armstrong
From the article: “Losing Power” in the “Scorecard” section
In Sports Illustrated, 30 June 2014
Written by:   L. Jon Wertheim
[Sometimes life is more ironic than fiction.    —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2013 Driving Passion
2012 Cannibal, n.
2011 Moments Of Truth

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I’ve been thinking about today, and what I could say to you.  It suddenly occurred to me that one of the last speeches you will hear in college will be this one.  That scared me half to death.
I mean, what can I tell you?  I never finished high school. I never, sadly, attended college.  As a youngster, I was traveling the length and breadth of the British Isles, singing my head off in the Music Halls — a theater brat, with a freaky four-and-a-half-octave range.
You might assume that after a life in theater and film, I wouldn’t be nervous in a situation like this, but I can assure you that I am or was, before your very warm welcome.
Today is about celebration, but despite that, you might just also be feeling a little nervous — and, perhaps even fearful.  Believe me, feeling nervous is par for the course.
I remember saying once to my husband, Blake, on the eve of my return to Broadway after a 35-year absence, ‘You know, I’m really feeling VERY frightened about this,’ and I began to tear up.
He simply replied, ‘Darling, did you actually expect to feel anything else?’
I remembered — yet again — that fear is a part of life.  The trick is to recognize it and then press on anyway.  In fact, the real trick is to stop focusing on oneself and start focusing on others.
There was a time in my late 20s when I worried all the time what audiences thought.  Will they like me?  Am I up to par?  And it suddenly dawned on to me that everyone in the audience had paid good money to come see a show they really wanted to see, and possibly, they were there after a day of dealing with a lot of stress.  Maybe it was tax time, perhaps someone had a family member who was ill, or had a fight with a loved one — I could think of a hundred scenarios.  I realized that I was in a position to brighten their day, to make a difference, to give them three hours of surcease, of transcendence, and hopefully, joy.
From that moment on, I began to develop a mindset of giving.  I stopped looking inward, I began to grow up and I started looking outward, with an eye toward making a difference wherever and whenever I could.
Today, I invite you to start looking at life the same way.
There are so many opportunities for giving in this world.
Don’t engage in random acts of kindness; engage in planned acts of kindness.
Use your knowledge and your heart to stand up for those who can’t stand.
Speak for those who can’t speak.
    —   Julie Andrews
At the 2013 commencement ceremony for Colorado University
Found at:  http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/nfl/news/20130527/brian-urlacher-peter-king-monday-morning-quarterback/#ixzz2UYnJ2Ova
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On This Day In:
2012 Something Of Value
2011 Sleep All Day

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It’s so tempting to believe, in sports, like in life, that there is a right way and a wrong way, a correct way and incorrect ones.  It probably isn’t so.  Sure, there are principles.  There are general rules.  There are proven philosophies.  But there are so many shades, so many complexities, so many uncertainties, so many quirks and sharp turns and unforeseeable consequences.  The very best plan can fail.  The very worst can succeed spectacularly.  The best intentions can lead to disaster.  The worst can lead to fame and fortune.
   —    Joe Posnanski
From his Sports Illustrated blog:  “Hollas and Tebow
Dated 17 December 2011
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Friday night I finished reading “Blood, Sweat and Chalk” by Tim Layden (2010).  I saw an advance article about it in Sports Illustrated and the book was also highly recommended by Peter King (a columnist with SI).
I was hoping for some insight into the game I grew-up loving – American Football.  Not your usual personality piece so common today.  Sorry, that’s EXACTLY what this book is and it offers almost nothing else.  It’s basically a history of a number of main schemes without explaining the scheme, why it works, what it doesn’t work against and why it may be different from any other scheme.  If you want to know about when a general idea (wishbone, split-t, I formation, etc) was thought up, and by whom, the book is barely adequate.  If you want to know which coaches had direct influence on others (because they worked together on the same team), this is the book for you.
I found the writing dull (a surprise for Tim Layden, who is normally pretty good in SI); the scheme selection adequate; the scheme descriptions poor (at best); and, for me at least, fairly useless in terms of better understanding the game at any level Pop Warner, high school, college or professional.  All in all, a major disappointment which I (stupidly) paid full price for.
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