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Posts Tagged ‘Religious Tolerance’

Words Of Wisdom

So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.
Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view, and demand that they respect yours.
Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.
Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people.
Prepare a noble death song for the day when you go over the great divide.
Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place.
Show respect to all people and grovel to none.
When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food and for the joy of living.
If you see no reason for giving thanks, the fault lies only in yourself.
Abuse no one and no thing, for abuse turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision.
When it comes your time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way.
Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.
  —  Chief Tecumseh (1768-1813 )
Shawnee Nation
[One of the blogs I follow is Command Performance Leadership.  The blog mentions the above “poem” as being read during the final scene of the movie “Act Of Valor” (which I have not yet seen).  (Click here for the link to the specific blog…)  Because I AM the nerd I am, I researched the poem a little to learn more before posting this blog.  In doing so, I found another interesting site titled: Wisdom Commons.  Enjoy!!
Finally, I believe from the moment of birth we each begin to sing our “death song“.  I only hope my own last notes are sung “like those of a hero going home.”  —  KMAB]
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In this enlightened Age and in this Land of equal liberty it is our boast, that a man’s religious tenets will not forfeit the protection of the Laws, nor deprive him of the right of attaining and holding the highest Offices that are known in the United States.
  —  George Washington
[Can a Mormon grow up to be President of the United States?  —  KMAB]
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Of course, congregational membership is not to be confused with truth.  All of the world’s great religions started small.  So while a denomination’s fall in membership may say a lot about what the people want, many would argue it doesn’t say anything about what God wants, or about what congregants will want over time.  The cold statistics now show that this new class of women clergy is having a tough time, as the stricter religions are growing and the liberalized religions are shrinking.  But this pendulum has swung many times before, and the role of religion today in so many of the world’s conflicts may cause a reaction against religious polarization, and then Stained Glass Ceiling Breakers may be the pioneers of a new movement poised to become the mainstream of modern religion.  Consensus and compassion may be on the outs right now, but they are bound to make a comeback.
 

—  Mark J. Penn
Quoted from “Microtrends” by Mark J. Penn with E. Kinney Zalesne
 

[The idea of “Stained Glass Ceiling Breakers” reminded me of “The DaVinci Code“.  Bold prediction time: Women in the Catholic priesthood is just a matter of time.  Keep the faith, ladies.  —  KMAB]

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Whilst we assert for ourselves a freedom to embrace, to profess and to observe the Religion which we believe to be of divine origin, we cannot deny an equal freedom to those whose minds have not yet yielded to the evidence which has convinced us.
  —  James Madison
(from “Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments“)
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In the 200+ year history of this country, every few years there is an attack on the separation of Church and State in the United States.  These attacks have been more or less consistent for the last 50 years.  These attacks come mostly from those who seek political gain from the lack of historical knowledge by current citizenry of the actual beliefs of our “Founding Fathers”.
 

One of those “Founding Fathers” – James Madison – was the fourth President of the United States, the primary author of the Constitution of the United States, and he is widely considered to be the “Father of the Bill of Rights”.
 

In 1785, while Madison was serving in the Virginia House of Delegates, there was an attempt to pass a bill providing public support for teachers of religious education.  Madison’s “Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments” was his response.  It serves today as a reminder that the Fathers of our country REALLY did believe in the separation of Church and State and did NOT support public funding of Christian (or any other religious) education.

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