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Posts Tagged ‘On Reading’

Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
  —  Joseph Addison
[How’s that for an addition to your New Year’s resolutions?  Happy New Year’s everyone!  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2013 Another New Year’s Thought (In Case It Rains)
Happy New Year – 2013!
2012 Best Wishes For 2012!
Where Did You Spend New Year’s Eve?
2011 Happy New Year (2011)!!

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Reading, like all work, has its rules.  A perfect knowledge of a few writers and a few subjects is more valuable than a superficial one of a great many.  The fine points of a piece of writing are seldom apparent at first reading.  In youth, one should search among books as one searches the world for friends, and once these friends are found, chosen, and adopted, one must go into retirement with them.  Intimacy with Montaigne, Saint Simon, Retz, Balzac, or Proust would be enough to enrich one’s whole life.
    —    André Maurois
[Of course there can never be anything approaching “a perfect knowledge” of anything and I could easily argue there is a time and place for the generalist as well as for the expert.  Be that as it may, I completely agree that an author’s works can come to seem like a friendship we can carry within ourselves forever and seek to revisit frequently.   —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Cadet Prayer
2011 Easy To Tell
2010 A NEW Lion In The Senate (Channeling Mr. Smith)
Inception Redux
A Quick Hit Of Stats

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But the novel will never die.
It is immortal because human beings just haven’t found – and perhaps never will discover – a form of storytelling and expression that reveals the workings of a mind and heart the way a well-crafted novel does.  It is a wholly pre-technological medium: a succession of monochrome sheets bearing arranged chunks of curly cuneiform.  Yet through these lines you connect with another psyche trimmed of its gender, age, epoch, social class, and ethnic identity.  The author may’ve been dead a thousand years.   Still when you finish the last page you want to keep the conversation going – to write to them, to have coffee with them.  “Tell me more about…”.
For all of their charms, songs, sculptures, movies – they do not have that power.  Novels, which are written alone and in silence, and are savored by readers in the same way, are not in danger of going so long as people are still around.
   —    From a blog I follow:  The Bully Pulpit, which is actually at – http://jrbenjamin.com/
The original post was: http://jrbenjamin.com/2013/10/11/the-novel-will-never-die/
[I have only recently begun to follow this site, but it looks very interesting so far…   —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Passing…
2011 Fake It ‘Til You Make It

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The Only way to do all the things you’d like to do is to read.
   —    Tom Clancy
[Found on a blog I follow: http://dshenai.wordpress.com/
The specific post is:  http://dshenai.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/tribute-to-tom-clancy-with-his-insightful-quotes/
 Thanks Deo!   —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 2012 National League Champions – San Francisco Giants!!
2nd Viewing – No Change
Light Shining Out of Darkness
 2011 Just Kickin It
Are These The “Real” Protectors Of America’s Constitution?
2010 Giants Advance To 2010 World Series!!!

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Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem to be confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakably meant for his ear; the profit of books is according to the sensibility of the reader; the profoundest thought or passion sleeps as in a mine, until it is discovered by an equal mind and heart.
   —    Ralph Waldo Emerson
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On This Day In:
2012 Two-Sided Coin
2011 Passionately Scorned Rules

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We hope from – even demand of – our reading that it deliver us from the tyranny of the mundane.  There is more to life than these four walls.  And the soul sings – in reader and writer – to envision something larger behind that corner up ahead.
This quote was found at one of the blogs I follow: http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/
The specific post is:  http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/the-writing-process-ii-why-we-read-part-4/
[Well worth the visit.   —   KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Bore, n.
2011 Attaining High Office

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There is much to be said concerning retirement.  Some men cannot survive it because they have not prepared themselves for it.  For the man who has retained his curiosity, retirement in old age can be the most enjoyable period of his life; but he must be aware of the emptiness of public renown and desire the peace of obscurity; he must still have the wish to learn and understand; in his village, his garden, or his house, he must have some restricted personal occupation.  The wise man, after having given all his time to his public activities, now devotes himself entirely to his personal affairs and development; and this will be easier for him if he has been able to interest himself in poetry and the beauties of nature, even during his busiest years.  For myself, I cannot imagine a pleasanter old age than one spent in the not too remote country where I could reread and annotate my favorite books.  “The mind,” says Montaigne, “must thrive upon old age as the mistletoe upon a dead oak.”
   —    André Maurois
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On This Day In:
2012 And When I’m Gone…
2011 Complete Conviction

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As a teenager, I sought out this transformed reality in the proverbial escape into books away from my unhappiness.  We like to lose this world, our very self, in a good book.  But reading isn’t just anesthesia or a verbal trip to the theme park.  We’re not only running from something, in many cases, but running to.
[Found at one of the blogs I follow: http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/
The specific post is: http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/the-writing-process-ii-why-we-read-part-4/   —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Suddenly
2011 Liberal Washington
2010 Giants Advance To NLCS!!

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All my life I’ve looked at words as though I were seeing them for the first time.
   —    Letter (9 April 1945);
Published in:  “Ernest Hemingway: Selected Letters 1917–1961
Edited by: Carlos Baker
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On This Day In:
2012 Make Both
2011 Are You Happy Yet?

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Apart from how interesting he is to read of, the boogeyman is someone we all know.  We’ve all been afraid.  Whether of the real person who haunts you or the voice in the dark that murmurs you’re not good enough.
[Found at a blog I follow: http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/
The specific post is: http://aholisticjourney.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/the-writing-process-ii-why-we-read-part-4/
   —    KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Does Uncommonly Flexible = Flip-Flopping?
2011 A Modest Review Of A Modern Day Classic
Encouragement Is The Path To Immortality

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Every man who knows how to read has it in his power to magnify, to multiply the ways in which he exists, to make his life full, significant and interesting.
   —    Aldous Huxley
[And for those of you not quite up to speed on Latin: “Reading increases my existence“.   —    KMAB]
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I do not speed-read books; it seems to defeat the whole purpose of the exercise, much like speed-eating a Porterhouse steak or applying the two-minute drill to sex.
   —     Joe Queenan
From:  “One for the Books
[This quote is from a column posted on the Wall Street Journal online site titled: “My 6,128 Favorite Books“, and is an excerpt from Queenan’s book.
I found the link to this article on a blog I follow: Lead.Learn.Live maintained by David Kanigan.  Dave’s blog was titled: “He’s Read 6128 Books
Like most “readers”, I’ve been down the path of learning to speed-read.  From high school, to college, to multiple companies – everyone seems to want me to read faster.  I CAN read reasonably fast when I need to.  I know how to look ahead, skip non-critical words, change speed for content / purpose, etc ad nauseam.  But when I read, I tend to cherish words and ideas; thinking new thoughts about new things or in different ways.  When I read for pleasure – and I mostly read for pleasure – I take my time and cherish ever flavor, every nuance, every smell, every touch created by the author’s imagination and conveyed through the language of words to my imagination.  Of course, I enjoy a two-minute drill as much as the next person, but I don’t want EVERY experience to be a two-minute drill any more than I want EVERY experience to be a two-hour visit to the dentist (mixed metaphor/pun intended).  —  KMAB]
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