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Posts Tagged ‘On Learning’

An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.
   —  Benjamin Franklin
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On This Day In:
2016 Brief Glimpses And Full Glances
2015 Pursuing Perspective
2014 Wearing Down?
2013 Labouring Under A Curse
2012 Listen To Yourself
2011 Career Tips (Part 1)
No Captain Dunsel

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He who has no inclination to learn more will be very apt to think that he knows enough.
   —  Thomas Powell
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On This Day In:
2016 Now Or Ever
21, Pause, Restart
2015 I Am Shocked, Sir, Shocked…
Lucy & FSND-2
2014 Less Difficult
2013 The Spirit Of Liberty
2012 The Essential Freedom Of Aloneness
2011 A Problem Of Scale
Fred Doesn’t Live Here Anymore
2010 Another Book, Another Jog…

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I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn’t learn something from him.
   —  Galileo Galilei
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On This Day In:
2015 Adaptive Security
2014 Wants
2013 Side Effects
2012 Just Trying To Earn A Living
2011 Productive Worry

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Few minds are spacious; few even have an empty place in them or can offer some vacant point.  Almost all have narrow capacities and are filled by some knowledge that blocks them up.  What a torture to talk to filled heads, that allow nothing from the outside to enter them!  A good mind, in order to enjoy itself and allow itself to enjoy others, always keeps itself larger than its own thoughts.  And in order to do this, these thoughts must be given a pliant form, must be easily folded and unfolded, so that they are capable, finally, of maintaining a natural flexibility.
All those short-sighted minds see clearly within their little ideas and see nothing in those of others; they are like those bad eyes that see from close range what is obscure and cannot perceive what is clear from afar.  Night minds, minds of darkness.
   ―  Joseph Joubert
From: “The Notebooks of Joseph Joubert
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On This Day In:
2015 Expressing Nonsense
2014 A Real Fight
2013 Unravelling
2012 I Resolve
2011 Practice, Practice, Practice
2009 Phoenix Trip (July ’09)

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There is much pleasure to be gained from useless knowledge.
   —    Bertrand Russell
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On This Day In:
2015 Filling Gaps
2014 Even In Our Sleep
2013 Passion Is Always Personal
2012 And You Are?
2011 Innate Talent

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That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
    —    Aldous Huxley
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On This Day In:
2015 Goals
2014 Switch To Dogs…
2013 Times Change
2012 Ashes Not Dust
2011 A Handful From Saudi
None Of This Happened
Take Responsibility

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How to grow great [software] designers:
1.  Systematically identify top designers as early as possible.  The best are often not the most experienced.
2.  Assign a career mentor to be responsible for the development of the prospect, and keep a careful career file.
3.  Devise and maintain a career development plan for each prospect, including carefully selected apprenticeships with top designers, episodes of advanced formal education, and short courses, all interspersed with solo design and technical leadership assignments.
4.  Provide opportunities for growing designers to interact and stimulate each other.
  —  Fred Brooks
From his essay: “No Silver Bullet
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On This Day In:
2015 When It Is Darkest
2014 Knowledge And Doubt
2013 Three Thoughts
2012 Gentle Reader
2011 Leave The Light On For Me Anyway

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I cannot teach anybody anything.  I can only make them think.
  ―  Socrates
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On This Day In (Leap Year):
2012 Stingray – TV Series Review  (This is my most popular post since starting my blog – hands down!  It still draws hits almost every week.  The hits seem to come mostly from Central Europe.  I guess the show must be in syndication there.)
A Single Thread

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Security can only be achieved through constant change, through discarding old ideas that have outlived their usefulness and adapting others to current facts.
   —  William O. Douglas
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On This Day In:
2014 Wants
2013 Side Effects
2012 Just Trying To Earn A Living
2011 Productive Worry

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History shows us how to behave.  History teaches, reinforces what we believe in, what we stand for…  History is — or should be — the bedrock of patriotism.  Not the chest-pounding kind of patriotism, but the real thing: love of country.
At their core, the lessons of history are largely lessons in appreciation.  Everything we have, all our great institutions, hospitals, universities, libraries, this city, our laws, our music, art, poetry, our freedoms, everything is because somebody went before us and did the hard work, provided the creative energy, provided the money, provided the belief.  Do we disregard that?
Indifference to history isn’t just ignorant, it’s rude.  It’s a form of ingratitude.
I’m convinced that history encourages, as nothing else does, a sense of proportion about life, and gives us a sense of the relative scale of our own time on earth and how valuable it is.
What history teaches it teaches mainly by example.  It inspires courage and tolerance.  It encourages a sense of humor.  It is an aid to navigation in perilous times…  Think how tough our predecessors were.  Think what they had been through.  There’s no one in this room who hasn’t an ancestor who went through some form of hell.  Churchill in his great speech in the darkest hours of the Second World War, when he crossed the Atlantic, reminded us, ‘We haven’t journeyed this far because we are made of sugar candy.'[…]
But, I think, what it really comes down to is that history is an extension of life.  It both enlarges and intensifies the experience of being alive.  It’s like poetry and art.  Or music.  And it’s ours, to enjoy.  If we deny our children that enjoyment, that adventure in the larger part of the human experience, we’re cheating them out of a full life.
There’s no secret to making history come alive.  Barbara Tuchman said it perfectly: ‘Tell stories.’  The pull, the appeal is irresistible, because history is about two of the greatest of all mysteries — time and human nature.
How lucky we are.  How lucky we are to enjoy in our work and in our lives, the possibilities, the precision and reach, the glories of the English language.  How lucky we are, how very lucky we are, to live in this great country, to be Americans — Americans all.
  —  David McCullough
Speaking at the 1995 National Book Awards.
[This quote was fount at one of the blogs I follow: “The Bully Pulpit
The specific post can be found at: http://jrbenjamin.com/2014/07/12/why-history/
The site is well worth a visit…  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2014 Future Envy
2013 We Do Not Want To Learn That
2012 Social Inhibition
2011 Studying Chinese Food
Are You Bored, Too?
2010 Rant, Pant, Deep Breath – Reality

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Nobody ever figures out what life is all about, and it doesn’t matter.  Explore the world.  Nearly everything is really interesting if you go into it deeply enough.
   ―  Richard Feynman
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On This Day In:
2014 Intentional Mapping
2013 The Sweet Path
2012 Living Free And Abolition
Morning Wood
2011 I Resemble That Remark

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After Two Weeks We Remember

10% of what we read
20% of what we hear
30% of what we see
50% of what we see and hear
70% of what we discuss with others
80% of what we personally experience
95% of what we teach others
  —  Edgar Dale
[And I thought it was just me…  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2014 A Prayer
Orange October (IX) – Giants Lose Game 2 In Bullpen Collapse
2013 Complacent Reality
2012 Two-minute Sex
Just Staring, Why?
2011 A World Of Difference

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Children growing up in any modern culture have an opportunity to learn to become conceptually fluent by becoming verbally fluent.  It’s that simple.  Although many people have the impression that the ability to spin ideas into meaningful webs of persuasion must be an in-born skill, probably determined by IQ, the simple fact is that conceptual fluency is largely a matter of verbal fluency.  A person who has a limited vocabulary has a limited ability to speak — and think — conceptually.  Conversely, a person who has a large and diversified vocabulary, and who’s willing to use it appropriately in various conversational situations, has a high level of conceptual skill.
   —  Karl Albrecht
From his book: “Practical Intelligence
[Click on book title to see my review of the book.  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2014 Familiar
2013 Unbending
2012 Simple Sayings
2011 Wupped Again?
2010 3 and 1…
Musical Notes…
Doubt Tries…
Northwest Passages – Evening Two
The Beierly’s Web Site

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In training a child to activity of thought, above all things we must beware of what I will call “inert ideas”  —  that is to say, ideas that are merely received into the mind without being utilized, or tested, or thrown into fresh combinations.
Every intellectual revolution which has ever stirred humanity into greatness has been a passionate protest against inert ideas.  Then, alas, with pathetic ignorance of human psychology, it has proceeded by some educational scheme to bind humanity afresh with inert ideas of its own fashioning.
  —   Alfred North Whitehead
From his book: “The Aims Of Education
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On This Day In:
2014 Worth Anything?
2013 Bruises Before Bed (Or Why You Didn’t Answer)
Revealed Riches
2012 Extra Gears
2011 Say What?
2010 Hello Frogs…

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Man’s mind, once stretched by a new idea, never regains its original dimensions.
  —  Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
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On This Day In:
2014 Outta Here
2013 Getting Words Right
2012 There’s A New Dog In Town
Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is
2011 A Conservative Is…

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