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Posts Tagged ‘Matthew Polly’

I followed along Aldous Huxley’s path and started to develop what I jokingly called my Unified Field Theory of Religion.  My working hypothesis was that the cosmos was made up of spirit and matter, heaven and earth, and that humans consisted of both elements, a body and a soul, dust and divinity.  The mystical experience was what happened when the divine or God or Allah or whatever name you prefer breaks through the mundane in a particular soul and exposes it to the universal spirit.
 

—  Matthew Polly
From his book: “American Shaolin
 

 

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The sayers do not know and the knowers do not say.
 

—  Lao-Tzu
From: “American Shaolin“, by Matthew Polly

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Only those who have tasted the bitterest of the bitter can become people who stand out among others.
 

—  Guanchang Xianxing Ji
Found in: “American Shaolin“, by Matthew Polly

 

 

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It is only when a person gets into difficulty that one can truly see his heart.
 

—  Traditional Chinese Proverb
Found in: “American Shaolin“, by Matthew Polly
 

 

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“Heroes don’t die in American movies.”
 

“They do in Chinese movies.”
 

“I know, but not in American movies.”
 

“Then they aren’t heroes.”
 

“Why do you say that?”
 

Little Tiger paused to think.  “I don’t know.  They’re just not.”
 

Feeling like I was on to something important, I pressed.  “But why do you think that?”
 

Dequing, [one of the author’s instructors] who had been following the exchange, said, “Because it doesn’t take much courage to fight when you still believe you can win.  What takes real courage is to keep fighting when all hope is gone.”
 

—  Matthew Polly
From his book: “American Shaolin
 

 

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To suffer and learn a lesson, one pays a high price, but a fool can’t learn any other way.
 

—  Traditional Chinese Proverb
Found in: “American Shaolin“, by Matthew Polly
 

 

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Yesterday I suffered another bad bout with my kidney stones.  I took advantage of the time off to finish the book: “American Shaolin“, by Matthew Polly (2007©).  This is a story about a young man who drops out of college to travel to the middle of China to spend two years learning about Kung-Fu.  Because he has been raised as a “nerdy” romantic from the mid-west (Kansas), it’s not good enough to just study Kung-Fu in America, he has to go all the way to the Shaolin temple.
 

The book is more about coming of age and Chinese culture than it is about martial arts.  Kung-Fu is really just the vehicle to carry us through the author’s voyage / passage into adulthood.  The story is a very fast read even though it’s over 350 pages.  Basically, I read it in one full day and one half day.
 

As per usual, I came upon the motivation to read this book quite by serendipity.  I found the book at Half-Price Books for $2 a couple of months ago, so I picked it up thinking I’ll add it to my martial arts library and maybe get around to reading it eventually.   Well, it turns out one of the blogs I follow has an interview with the author discussing learning – basically, the rule of 10,000.  Since I knew I had the book on my shelf, I thought this is the universe’s way of telling me to read it.  So, “eventually” came sooner than I expected.
 

If you are at all interested in Chinese culture, you should read this book.  It is a gold mine – a treasure trove.  For example, the Chinese begin bargaining with a cigarette.  It is usually offered by the seller and depending on how quickly you take it (if at all) and how you take it (with humility) and what type you ask for (American – expensive; Chinese – cheaper), you set the tone for the entire negotiation.  This is the kind of real world experience you can only get by spending a fair amount of time living with and reflecting on a particular culture.
 

There is not much in the book about fighting or Kung-Fu, but that’s okay.  Many times the best books about a culture have nothing to do with the vehicle for examining the culture and everything to do with the view as you travel.  In other words, it is the Chinese people who make this a entertaining and fascinating book.  Not the martial art.  Highly recommended!!
 

Oh, incidentally, the “rule of 10,000” is that you must practice something 10,000 times before you can become proficient at it.  From there, you can begin to achieve mastery.
 
 

 

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