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Posts Tagged ‘David Kanigan’

Ours is not the task of fixing the entire world all at once, but of stretching out to mend the part of the world that is within our reach.  Any small, calm thing that one soul can do to help another soul, to assist some portion of this poor suffering world, will help immensely.  It is not given to us to know which acts or by whom, will cause the critical mass to tip toward an enduring good.  What is needed for dramatic change is an accumulation of acts, adding, adding to, adding more, continuing.  We know that it does not take everyone on Earth to bring justice and peace, but only a small, determined group who will not give up during the first, second, or hundredth gale.
One of the most calming and powerful actions you can do to intervene in a stormy world is to stand up and show your soul.  Soul on deck shines like gold in dark times.  The light of the soul throws sparks, can send up flares, builds signal fires, causes proper matters to catch fire.  To display the lantern of soul in shadowy times like these – to be fierce and to show mercy toward others; both are acts of immense bravery and greatest necessity.
   —  Clarissa Pinkola Estes
You Were Made For This (Awakin.org, Jan 28, 2008)
[From one of the blogs I follow: Live & Learn
Run by David Kanigan
The specific post is located at: http://davidkanigan.com/2016/12/01/lightly-child-lightly-97/   Well worth checking out both sites.  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2016 Here’s Lookin’ At You Kid
2015 How To Be Omnipotent
2014 The Promise Of Future Love
2013 Christian, n.
2012 Praise
Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood
2011 A Few More Lyrics From The Past
5 For The Price Of 1

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And it occurs to me that
there is a proper balance between
not asking enough of oneself and
asking or expecting too much.
It may be that I set my sights too high
and so repeatedly end a day in depression.
Not easy to find the balance,
for if one does not have wild dreams of achievement,
there is no spur even to get the dishes washed.
One must think like a hero to behave like a merely decent human being.
  —  May Sarton
Journal of a Solitude
[Found at one of the blogs I follow: “Live & Learn” run by David Kanigan
The blog is at:  http://davidkanigan.com/
The specific post is at:  http://davidkanigan.com/2016/01/05/di%c2%b7lem%c2%b7ma-n/
Enjoy!  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2015 Reductionism
2014 Gravitation, n.
2013 Ups And Downs
2012 Nerd Heard – And Good-Bye
Your Continuum
2011 Career Tips (Part 2)

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If we are to measure and monitor and improve anything, let it be our presence and character, a mindfulness for who we are and how we are experiencing and relating with the world.  Have I been true to myself?  Have I lived vibrantly today?  Have I loved openly today?  Have I made a difference today?  Let us check in to ourselves in these ways; for, in the end, these are the only measures that matter.
  —  Brendon Burchard
[Found at on of the blogs I follow: http://davidkanigan.com/
The specific post is found at: http://davidkanigan.com/2014/05/28/yet-our-useless-fascination-goes-on/
  —  KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2013 Remembering, Yet Again
2012 Something Of Value
2011 Sleep All Day

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Self Portrait
It doesn’t interest me if there is one God
or many gods.
I want to know if you belong or feel
abandoned.
If you know despair or can see it in others.
I want to know
if you are prepared to live in the world
with its harsh need
to change you. If you can look back
with firm eyes
saying this is where I stand. I want to know
if you know
how to melt into that fierce heat of living
falling toward
the center of your longing. I want to know
if you are willing
to live, day by day, with the consequence of love
and the bitter
unwanted passion of your sure defeat.
I have heard, in that fierce embrace, even
the gods speak of God.
   —    David Whyte
From his book:  “Fire in the Earth
[I found this poem on a blog I follow: http://davidkanigan.com
The actual post is:  http://davidkanigan.com/2013/04/09/in-that-fierce-embrace-even-the-gods-speak-of-god/
The poem’s author is David Whyte, who you can find out more about at his own blog/web site:  http://www.davidwhyte.com/home.html  —   KMAB]
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On This Day In:
2012 Hangin’ With His P’s
Help Save
2011 Six Facets Of Good Leadership

 

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We must be silent before we can listen. We must listen before we can learn. We must learn before we can prepare. We must prepare before we can serve. We must serve before we can lead.
  —  William Arthur Ward
[Found on one of the blogs I follow.
The site is titled:  “Lead.Learn.Live.” but actually goes to  http://davidkanigan.com
This particular entry is at:  http://davidkanigan.com/2013/02/19/serve/
I don’t mention / encourage this as much as I probably should, but feel free to type the name “William Arthur Ward” into the “Look For Stuff” search box on the right hand side of my blog (hit enter) and you’ll see a number of interesting quotes from Mr. Ward.  —  KMAB]
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…there’s an old saying: that which does not kill you makes you stronger.  i don’t believe that.  i think the things that try to kill you make you angry and sad.  strength comes from the good things: your family, your friends, the satisfaction of hard work. those are the things that keep you whole, those are the things to hold on to when you’re broken.
  —  Jax Teller
a character on the TV show:  “Sons of Anarchy
[I found this quote on a blog I follow: Lead.Learn.Live maintained by David Kanigan.  The actual posting was: http://davidkanigan.com/2012/11/05/no-pain-no-gain/  Dave’s site contains a variety of interesting an motivational postings.  Check it out.  —  KMAB]
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Until recently, I wasn’t aware how completely books dominate my physical existence.  Only when I started cataloging my possessions did I realize that there are books in every room in my house, 1,340 in all.  My obliviousness to this fact has an obvious explanation: I am of Irish descent, and to the Irish, books are as natural and inevitable a feature of the landscape as sand is to Tuaregs or sand traps are to the frat boys at Myrtle Beach.  You know, the guys with the belted shorts.  When the English stormed the Emerald Isle in the 17th century, they took everything that was worth taking and burned everything else.  Thereafter, the Irish had no land, no money, no future.  That left them with words, and words became books, and books, ingeniously coupled with music and alcohol, enabled the Irish to transcend reality.
People who need to possess the physical copy of a book, not merely an electronic version, believe that the objects themselves are sacred. Some people may find this attitude baffling, arguing that books are merely objects that take up space.  This is true, but so are Prague and your kids and the Sistine Chapel.  Think it through, bozos.
The world is changing, but I am not changing with it.  There is no e-reader or Kindle in my future.  My philosophy is simple: Certain things are perfect the way they are.  The sky, the Pacific Ocean, procreation and the Goldberg Variations all fit this bill, and so do books.  Books are sublimely visceral, emotionally evocative objects that constitute a perfect delivery system.
Electronic books are ideal for people who value the information contained in them, or who have vision problems, or who have clutter issues, or who don’t want other people to see that they are reading books about parallel universes where nine-eyed sea serpents and blind marsupials join forces with deaf Valkyries to rescue high-strung albino virgins from the clutches of hermaphrodite centaurs, but they are useless for people engaged in an intense, lifelong love affair with books.  Books that we can touch; books that we can smell; books that we can depend on.  Books that make us believe, for however short a time, that we shall all live happily ever after.
  —  Joe Queenan
From “One for the Books
[This quote is from a column posted on the Wall Street Journal online site titled: “My 6,128 Favorite Books“, and is an excerpt from Queenan’s book.
I found the link to this article on a blog I follow: Lead.Learn.Live maintained by David Kanigan.  Dave’s blog was titled: “He’s Read 6128 Books
I too suffer from book hoarding syndrome.  I too have a Nook.  I have tried it, but don’t care for it for reading books.  I use the Nook as a portable dictionary and web browser (mostly reading news or email).  I find it grossly inadequate as a tool for typing or other data input.  I use my home computer (desktop/netbook) for most everything else.
When I was younger, I would only open a book so wide as to read it, but not so wide as to break the binding.  Most of the books I bought were paperbacks as hardbound were far to expensive for my budget.  Now, while I “respect” the books (don’t destroy them), I also dog-ear them and underline them and write comments in the margins.  Over time, I’ve found that books are like old friends I’m having an on-going conversation with.  I can come back later to refresh the conversation or just touch bases with their ideas.  And, of course, there’s the requirement for a steady stream of quotes for this blog.  —  KMAB]
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If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another.  The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader.  If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it.  You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story.  For a bad story is only an ineffective story.
  —   John Steinbeck
[The above quote was found at a blog site I follow (and have mentioned several times): Lead.Learn.Live maintained by David Kanigan.
The specific quote was under the heading: “Writing Better
If there is a “magic” in blogging, it is that it allows those of us who are not traditional writers to express ourselves – to ease our “aching urge” – conveying to the universe of readers the moments in our days where something touched us and made us feel something important just happened in our lives.  Sometimes those things will be banally trite to most; but, sometimes, to others they will be like the light from a candle, passed from one to another, without loss to either but with more light for both.  —  KMAB]

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I do not speed-read books; it seems to defeat the whole purpose of the exercise, much like speed-eating a Porterhouse steak or applying the two-minute drill to sex.
  —  Joe Queenan
from “One for the Books
[This quote is from a column posted on the Wall Street Journal online site titled: “My 6,128 Favorite Books“, and is an excerpt from Queenan’s book.
I found the link to this article on a blog I follow: Lead.Learn.Live maintained by David Kanigan.  Dave’s blog was titled: “He’s Read 6128 Books
Like most “readers”, I’ve been down the path of learning to speed-read.  From high school, to college, to multiple companies – everyone seems to want me to read faster.  I CAN read reasonably fast when I need to.  I know how to look ahead, skip non-critical words, change speed for content/purpose, etc ad nauseam.  But when I read, I tend to cherish words and ideas; thinking new thoughts about new things or in different ways.  When I read for pleasure – and I mostly read for pleasure – I take my time and cherish ever flavor, every nuance, every smell, every touch created by the author’s imagination and conveyed through the language of words to my imagination.  Of course, I enjoy a two-minute drill as much as the next person, but I don’t want EVERY experience to be a two-minute drill any more than I want EVERY experience to be a two-hour visit to the dentist (mixed metaphor/pun intended).  —  KMAB]
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What do you see nurses?  What do you see?
What are you thinking when you’re looking at me?
A cranky old man, not very wise,
Uncertain of habit, with faraway eyes?
Who dribbles his food and makes no reply.
When you say in a loud voice, ‘I do wish you’d try!’
Who seems not to notice the things that you do.
And forever is losing a sock or shoe?
Who, resisting or not, lets you do as you will,
With bathing and feeding, the long day to fill?
Is that what you’re thinking?  Is that what you see?
Then open your eyes, nurse.  You’re not looking at me.
I’ll tell you who I am as I sit here so still,
As I do at your bidding, as I eat at your will.
I’m a small child of ten, with a father and mother,
Brothers and sisters who love one another
A young boy of sixteen with wings on his feet
Dreaming that soon now  a lover he’ll meet.
A groom soon at twenty my heart gives a leap.
Remembering, the vows that I promised to keep.
At twenty-five, now I have young of my own.
Who need me to guide and a secure happy home.
A man of thirty, my young now grown fast,
Bound to each other with ties that should last.
At forty, my young sons have grown and are gone,
But my woman is beside me to see I don’t mourn.
At fifty, once more, babies play ‘round my knee,
Again, we know children, my loved one and me.
Dark days are upon me.  My wife is now dead.
I look at the future.  I shudder with dread.
For my young are all rearing young of their own.
And I think of the years, and the love that I’ve known.
I’m now an old man and nature is cruel.
It’s jest to make old age look like a fool.
The body, it crumbles.  Grace and vigour, depart.
There is now a stone where I once had a heart.
But inside this old carcass,  A young man still dwells,
And now and again my battered heart swells.
I remember the joys, I remember the pain.
And I’m loving and living life over again.
I think of the years, all too few, gone too fast.
And accept the stark fact that nothing can last.
So open your eyes, people.  Open and see.
Not a cranky old man.
Look closer …  See …  Me.
[Another of those wonderful poems and inspirational words which end up making it to the internet and touching thousands of people.  I found this on a blog I follow maintained by David Kanigan:  Lead.Learn.Live
http://davidkanigan.com/2012/08/19/cranky-old-man/
If you have a chance, please visit David’s site and thank him for sharing this with us…  —  KMAB]
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Somewhere between checked out and freaked out lies an anxiety sweet spot… in which a person is motivated to succeed yet not so anxious that performance takes a dive.  This moderate amount of anxiety keeps people on their toes, enables them to juggle multiple tasks and puts them on high alert for potential problems.
  —    re-quoted from David Kanigan’s Blog: Lead.Learn.Live
[The specific post is located at:  http://davidkanigan.com/2012/06/20/your-anxiety-should-be-somewhere-between-checked-out-and-freaked-out/
which was, in turn, from WSJ.com: Anxiety Can Bring Out the Best
Very reminiscent of the comments made in the book: Future Shock by Alvin Toffler.  Although there, the accelerating rate of change being brought about by the future (actually, increasing volume of changes in the present) was what was causing the increased anxiety.   —  KMAB]
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Somebody said that it couldn’t be done
   But he with a chuckle replied
That “maybe it couldn’t,” but he would be one
   Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried.
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
   On his face.  If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
   That couldn’t be done, and he did it!
Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
   At least no one ever has done it;”
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat
   And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
   Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
   That couldn’t be done, and he did it.
There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
   There are thousands to prophesy failure,
There are thousands to point out to you one by one,
   The dangers that wait to assail you.
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
   Just take off your coat and go to it;
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing
   That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it.
  —   Written by: Edgar Albert Guest
[Sometimes I find a poem I like, but because it’s newly discovered, it doesn’t really fall under the heading of “favorites” and so doesn’t end up on my Poems page.  This is one of those.  At first it’s childish.  Read it again and you find yourself smiling.  Read it again and it seems profound.
I found this poem at one of the blogs I follow:
Lead.Learn.Live.
David Kanigan:  Inspiration, Ideas & Information
He, in turn, found it at:  www.poetryfoundation.org
Have fun looking at both!!  —  KMAB]
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