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Archive for October 16th, 2012

But Star Trek has done far more than that.  It has given us a legacy — a message man can create a future worth living for…  a future that is full of optimism, hope, excitement, and challenge.  A future that proudly proclaims man’s ability to survive in peace and reach for the stars as his reward.
Whither Star Trek?
It really doesn’t matter.  We have its legacy…  all we have to do is use it.
  —  Stephen E. Whitfield, Gene Roddenberry
from their book: “The Making of Star Trek
[One of my favorite scenes from the original series occurred in the episode “The Ultimate Computer“, in which Captain Kirk tries to explain how he feels about being the captain of the Enterprise:
Captain Kirk: “Do you know the one…  ‘All I ask is a tall ship?‘”
Dr. McCoy: “It’s a line from a poem, a very old poem, isn’t it?
Kirk: “Twentieth century Earth.  ‘All I… ask is a tall ship and a star… to steer her by.’
You…  You could feel the wind at your back in those days.  The sounds of the sea… beneath you, and even if you take away the wind and the water… it’s still the same. 
The ship is yours.  You can feel her.  And the stars are still there, Bones.
 
[The full poem being quoted by Kirk is titled:  “Sea Fever” and was written by John Masefield
I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.
I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.
I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull’s way and the whale’s way, where the wind’s like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.
Now personally, I’m a land-lubber, but even I can appreciate the sentiment of beauty, strength, grace, and hope in commanding a tall-ship and a loyal crew facing the vast challenge of the open ocean – which at that time must have seemed as immense as all of outer space now seems to us.  —  KMAB]
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