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Archive for November, 2011

The following are the Seven Spiritual Works of Mercy and the Seven Corporal Works of Mercy:

Spiritual works of mercy

  1. Teach the ignorant
  2. Counsel the doubtful;
  3. Admonish sinners;
  4. Bear wrongs patiently;
  5. Forgive offenses willingly;
  6. Comfort the afflicted;
  7. Pray for the living, the sick and the dead.

Corporal works of mercy

  1. To feed the hungry
  2. To give drink to the thirsty.
  3. To shelter the homeless.
  4. To clothe the naked.
  5. To visit and ransom the captive, (prisoners).
  6. To visit the sick.
  7. To bury the dead.
[Perhaps if we all performed them a little more frequently, we might be judged a little easier when our ultimate time comes…   —    KMAB]
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If you have been getting something for nothing for a long time, it’s rough to convince you to pay for it.  But pay Americans must.  In the years since the end of World War II, we have experimented with a number of schemes for producing the force we have needed, but none has been based on the notion of shared sacrifice.  It is arguable whether the current volunteer system or one in which we relied on a draft is worse, but suffice it to say that they are both bad.  We don’t need selective service.  We need universal service.  But there is great political danger in merely suggesting that all Americans contribute in a meaningful way to our collective defense, and so no politician who wants to keep his job will do it.  Consequently none does, and we are the poorer for it.
    —    Col. Jack Jacobs (Ret.), a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient (and Douglas Century)
From their book:  “If Not Now, When?
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But I have an inveterate, almost uncontrollable urge to tell the truth.  Truth has an awesome power.  It is important and beautiful for its own sake, but also, without it an ordered society is impossible.  I am driven to deliver it, and so I often blurt out things that are wholly accurate but inadvisably impolite.
   —    Col. Jack Jacobs (Ret.), a Congressional Medal of Honor recipient (and Douglas Century)
From their book:  “If Not Now, When?
[Would that more of us had the courage of this “failing”…   —    KMAB]
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TV is not vulgar and prurient and dumb because the people who compose the audience are vulgar and dumb.  Television is the way it is simply because people tend to be extremely similar in their vulgar and prurient and dumb interests and wildly different in their refined and aesthetic and noble interests.
   —    David Foster Wallace
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I hope you will reflect on what you’ve done with your talent and energy.  I hope you will judge yourselves not on your professional accomplishments alone, but also on how well you work to address the world’s deepest inequities, on how well you treat people a world away who have nothing in common with you but their humanity.
   —   William (“Bill”) Henry Gates, III
In a letter to the Harvard community
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I Resemble That Remark

As for me, except for an occasional heart attack, I feel as young as I ever did.
   —   Robert Benchley
[As someone living on multiple daily meds and with AFib, I can SOOOOOOO relate…    —    KMAB]
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If you’re going to do something different with your life because you’ve found out you’ve got a disease, then you’re not living as you should be.
   —    Arlo Guthrie
[Very reminiscent of the lyrics of one of my favorite songs:  Live Like You Were Dyin   —    KMAB]
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Often the test of courage is not to die but to live.
   —   Conte Vittorio Afieri
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Need and struggle are what excite and inspire us; our hour of triumph is what brings the void.
    —     William James
From the essay: “Is Life Worth Living?
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Nobody ever lies about being lonely.
    —   Montgomery Clift
From the movie: “From Here to Eternity
[Maybe when you are talking to someone else.  When I’m alone, I wonder if this is true?   —    KMAB]
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This weekend I watched three movies – one DVD and two on-line: “The Jericho Mile” (1979), “Bruce Lee – The Legend” (1977), and “Woman of the Year” (1942).  They are all good movies for very different reasons.
The Jericho Mile” stars Peter Strauss as Rain Murphy, a man serving life for murdering his father.  The movie has multiple themes: crime, racism, friendship, corruption, justice and (mainly) running.  Rain is serving his time by running around the exercise yard of Folsom Prison.  He is fast and it gets noticed.  There are three rival racial factions in the prison: the Whites, the Blacks and the Hispanics.  Rain’s black friend and training partner runs afoul of the White gang and is murdered.  The gang tells the Black gang it was Rain’s fault and the leader of the gang beats up Rain.  Behind the scenes, the warden and the prison psych want to use Rain to inspire other prisoners to rehabilitate themselves and arrange for Rain to get a chance to run against some college runners in the hopes of getting a shot at qualifying for the USA Olympic Team.
My favorite line in the movie belongs to Murphy.  After getting beaten up, he promises to nail the Black gang leader for insulting his friend/brother and the leader asks Rain what he intends to do after that.  Rain, who is badly beaten and struggling to breathe, let alone stand up, replies: “I gotta finish my workout.
It is a terrific movie which I saw in it’s original broadcast back in 1979 (as a “Movie of the Week”).  The final running scene set against the Rolling Stones “Sympathy for the Devil” instrumental is a cinema classic (as far as I’m concerned”).  The movie just appeared up on YouTube.com, so you better go see it while it’s still up there!  Strauss won an Emmy for this role.  The movie won a total of three.
Bruce Lee – The Legend” is a documentary about the life and art (martial and theatrical) of Bruce Lee.  This is the first time I’ve seen the documentary and it’s a typical promotion of a dead star by the Chinese movie industry.  Having said that, the individual scenes of Bruce getting interviewed for a job and his describing Jeet Kune Do – the martial arts system Bruce created – is truly outstanding.  If you are interested in the background of a martial arts legend, this is a good place to start.  The question will always remain if Bruce was truly a great martial artist or just a handsome and charismatic actor who was also a superior athlete and martial artist.  Because there is no record (at least I’m not aware of any record) of Bruce Lee appearing in a “real” mixed martial art competition, I’m afraid it’s a question which will never be answered.  I watched this movie on HULU.com, which is a pretty good source of current TV shows and
Woman of the Year” stars Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy.  The film was their first movie together and their chemistry is obvious.  The movie is a about two competing newspaper writers – one on politics and the other on sports.  They meet.  Fall in love.  Marry.  And then the problems begin.  While the movie has some tremendously funny moments – especially when Hepburn’s character attempts to cook Tracy’s character breakfast, the movie is symptomatic of its time and has an incredibly sexist message that ultimately, every woman, no matter how successful, must ultimately define herself within her role as a wife (and eventual mother).  My daughter Sarah watched the movie with Hil and me and I asked her about this message.  She said she really didn’t see it that way at all and it was “just” a funny, but unrealistic movie.  I asked her why, and she replied, “One, she never would have married that far beneath her; and, two, she wouldn’t be able to stay home and live on only his salary when it was obvious she had a much more important (and well paying) job than he did.”  From the mouth of babes……
As I said, all three are entertaining movies for entirely different reasons, but I recommend all three – particularly “The Jericho Mile“.
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In this world there are only two tragedies.  One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.
   —    Oscar Wilde
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We are what we pretend to be.
   —    Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
From his book:  “Mother Night
[If we want to be bad enough and try to be hard enough.  Unless we aren’t…   —    KMAB]
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Whenever a new discovery is reported to the scientific world, they say first, ‘It is probably not true.‘  Thereafter, when the truth of the new proposition has been demonstrated beyond question, they say, ‘Yes, it may be true, but it is not important.‘  Finally, when sufficient time has elapsed to fully evidence its importance, they say, ‘Yes, surely it is important, but it is no longer new.‘ “
  —  Michel de Montaigne
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Be patient towards all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves.
    —    Rainer Maria Rilke
From:  “Letters to a Young Poet
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