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Archive for August 25th, 2010

In most of our abilities we differ not at all from the animals.  We are in fact behind many in swiftness and strength and other resources.  But because there is born in us the power to persuade each other and to show ourselves whatever we wish, we not only have escaped from living as brutes, but also by coming together have founded cities and set up laws and invented arts, and speech has helped us to attain practically all of the things we have devised.
   —   Isocrates
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One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.
   —   Johan Wolfgang Goethe
[…Eat a tasty meal and go for a walk or jog!   —   KMAB]
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Remember, democracy never lasts long.  It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself.  There never was a democracy yet that did not commit suicide.
   —    John Adams
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What is written without effort is, in general, read without pleasure.
   —   Dr. Samuel Johnson
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There is an artist imprisoned in each one of us.  Let him loose to spread joy everywhere!
   —   Bertrand Russell
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If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead & rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.
   —   Benjamin Franklin
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The great are not solitary; out of the night come the voices of those who have gone before, clear and courageous; and so through the ages they march, a mighty procession, proud, undaunted, unconquerable.  To join in this glorious company, to swell the immortal person of those whom fate could not subdue – this may not be happiness; but what is happiness to those whose souls are filled with that celestial music?  To them is given what is better than happiness: to know the fellowship of the great, to live in the inspiration of lofty thoughts, and to be illumined in every perplexity by the fire of nobility and truth.
   —  Bertrand Russell
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To relax and enter into the narrative of a good book is for me a pleasure rarely surpassed!  It is to escape the prison of one’s self, the tyranny of the here and now.  It is to understand today better through the prism of yesterday.  Good books are how the dead speak to the living, and their reading is how you and I participate in the great conversation of humanity.  To read is to travel across time to hear the voices of the sages and bards, to pronounce judgment on the high and mighty, to succor the afflicted, and to afflict the wicked.  It is to be alone never and bored rarely.
   —   Richard J. Geib
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Disagreement among ourselves is neither a vice nor a source of weakness; however, caustic incivility and dogmatic intolerance in the public discourse are poison to a democracy.  In my opinion, too many people yell at each other in the United States today.  People yelling at each other solves nothing.
   —  Richard J. Geib
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I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend.
   —    Thomas Jefferson
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Today I spent a great deal of time on the web looking into William Faulkner after reading a copy of his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize for Literature for 1949.  In looking him up, I discovered the site (web and blog) of one Richard J. Geib.
Although an openly avowed Republican, Richard demonstrates a remarkable (for Republicans) ability to think, reason and write.  —  Just kidding Rich!! —
In all seriousness, this is one heavy dude.  I don’t know him (yet); I’ve not emailed him or contacted him (yet); but everyone really needs to go look at his site!!  I’ve added his site link to my Faith, Family and Friends category because anyone who reads and thinks this much (and writes this well) is a soul-brother of mine in the time-space continuum.
Live long and prosper, bro!
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To all the hate-mongers in Arizona and the “Tea” Party, please consider the words of the Chairman of the Board.  (Click the link to read his full Op-Ed.)
As for the others, those cross-burning bigots to whom mental slavery is alive and well, I don’t envy their trials in the next world, where their thoughts and words and actions will be judged by a jury of One.  Why do so many among us continue in words and deeds to ignore, insult and challenge the unforgettable words of Thomas Jefferson, who drafted the Declaration of Independence’s promise to every man, woman and child–the self-evident truth that all are created equal?
“…Who in the name of God are these people anyway, the ones who elevate themselves above others?  America is an immigrant country.  Maybe not you and me, but those whose love made our lives possible, or their parents or grandparents.  America was founded by these people, who were fed up with other countries.
And finally, “…Even now, with all our problems, America is still a dream of oppressed people the world over.  Take a minute.  Consider what we are doing to each other as we rob friends and strangers of dignity as well as equality.  Give a few minutes of fairness to the house we live in, and to all who share it with us from sea to shining sea.  For if we don’t come to grips with this killer disease of hatred, of bigotry and racism and anti-Semitism, pretty soon we will destroy from within this blessed country.
If seeing the country torn apart by hatred breaks your heart (as it does mine), a final quote from Frank Sinatra on mending a broken heart: “You don’t.  I think being jilted is one of life’s most painful experiences.  It takes a long time to heal a broken heart. It’s happened to all of us and never gets any easier.  I understand, however, that playing one of my albums can help.
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As long as shy, reclusive farmers can write like this (William Faulkner’s Acceptance Speech for the Nobel Prize for Literature 1949) mankind will prevail!!!
To learn more about Faulkner,visit this site at the University of Mississippi.
Our tragedy today is a general and universal physical fear so long sustained by now that we can even bear it.
It seems the issue is no longer if we will be blown up, but rather, “Why is America no longer the country I was promised and the world no longer safe?” and more directly, “Who can I blame for this change, because it can’t have been my fault?”
Did you vote in Nov. 2000?  Nov. 2004?  Nov. 2008?  Will you vote in Nov. 2010?  Nov. 2012?  Do you want a continuing message of fear, hate and “them against us” or one of hope and calm reassurance?
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